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Pairing Green Tea With Food: A Guide to 5 Green Teas And Food Pairing

 

PAIRING GREEN TEA WITH FOOD: A GUIDE TO GREEN TEAS AND FOOD PAIRING

 

Although we’re used to the afternoon tea concept of hot tea served with scones and sandwiches, or as an after-dinner drink, pairing green tea with food or different dishes might seem like a new idea. But the right tea can improve any meal.

When pairing green tea with food or a dish that has been prepared with tea, there are a few different options. The tea used in the dish may be sipped alongside if its flavor in the food is subtle and would not become redundant.

When you’re pairing green tea with food or a dish that was not cooked with tea, consider the flavor profiles, aromatics, and textures of the tea and the dish. To start with, familiarize yourself with the characteristics of the tea. 

A more astringent tea is wonderful paired with richer foods for a textural pairing. An earthier tea goes well with meat or chocolate in a pairing of complementary flavors, and sweeter teas may balance nicely against a salty or a spicy dish, as an example of pairing for contrast. 

 

PAIRING GREEN TEA WITH FOOD

Green Tea and food pairing

Unoxidized Green Teas Generally pair well with seafood and fish, but the repairing has a bit of variation. Green teas can be broadly characterized as brothy, nutty, earthy, briny, vegetal, or sweet, and it is important to note which of these characteristics a particular tea exhibits when pairing green teas with food. Here is a list of  green teas and food pairing.

 

1) DRAGONWELL 

Dragonwell, also called Lung Ching green tea, is originally from Hangzhou in the Zhejiang Province Lake Region in China.

The finest Lung Ching can be stunning. It exhibits a unique flat shape because it is ironed during wok-firing. It has a slightly sweet, vegetal aroma, a mellow, smooth, chestnut-like flavor, beautiful jade green color, and lingering sweet finish. 

FOOD PAIRINGS:

Dragonwell has the astringency to pair particularly well with many kinds of cheese. It has a nutty quality that combines deliciously with a well-aged Gruyère. It also goes well with seafood, fish, fruits, and custards, and steeps well into vodka. 

 

2) GENMAICHA 

Genmaicha Green Tea and Food pairing

This famous green tea is combined with toasted brown rice. Sometimes powdered matcha is also added. When toasted, some of the brown rice pops, giving it the nickname “popcorn tea.”

The roasted brown rice eases the sharpness of the sencha, yielding a nutty, earthy, and relaxing tea, almost brothy.

FOOD PAIRINGS:

Genmaicha green tea pairs well with seafood, rice, chicken, and light vegetables.

 

3) GUNPOWDER 

This rich, full, assertive green tea typically from Zhejiang Province gets its name from the appearance of the tightly rolled leaves, which resemble gunpowder pellets.

It is used as the base tea for Moroccan mint tea and takes very well to sweeteners. Due to the tight roll of the leaf, Gunpowder holds its freshness very well for a green tea and, like all greens, is very vulnerable to overstepping. 

FOOD PAIRINGS:

Gunpowder tea pairs well with fish, lemon, mint, basil, and vinegar. Due to its pungency, it pairs more effectively with smoked and barbecued meats than many other green teas. 

 

4) SENCHA GREEN TEA

Pairing Sencha Green Tea with Food

This sun-grown and steamed tea is one of the most famous and readily available Japanese tea. 

Good-quality sencha offers a delicate sweetness, mild astringency, and herbaceous character. Watch the steeping time and temperature carefully as it is very prone to overstepping. 

FOOD PAIRINGS:

Sencha pairs very well with seafood, rice, egg dishes, and raw or lightly cooked vegetables. It infuses nicely into vodka or sake; adding fruits, herbs, or flower petals to the infusions can result in marvelous tea cocktails. 

 

 

5) GYOKURO 

This fine tea is shade-grown and steamed. The striking dark green needle-like leaves steep into a sweet and delicate liquor. 

This tea should be steeped at a much cooler temperature, around 140°F/60°C, for about 1 ½ minutes. 

FOOD PAIRINGS:

Gyokuro pairs well with seafood, rice, egg dishes, and raw or lightly cooked vegetables. With its delicate flavor, gyokuro is best enjoyed as a beverage, rather than used in cooking. 

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